made, remade, unmade

May 22 , 12:30 am

 —  2:00 am

All times are listed in Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

Kevin Jerome Everson, Filipa César, Burak Çevik, Diana Vidrascu, Shambhavi Kaul, Kahlil I. Pedizisai, Helen Cammock

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This program will be followed by a Q&A moderated by Alia Ayman.

Inventory

Kevin Jerome Everson
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
USA, 2020, 16MM>DIGITAL, 5 MIN
ENGLISH

 

Based on Želimir Žilnik’s classic Inventur (1975), military personnel introduce themselves to the camera as they descend a staircase at the Columbus Air Force Base 14th Flying Training Wing in Columbus, Mississippi.

 

While Cursed by Specters

Burak Çevik
CANADIAN PREMIERE
TURKEY, 2020, DIGITAL, 10 MIN
NO DIALOGUE

 

This haunting intervention removes all human traces from Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub’s 1984 film Class Relations, in which German locations were used to represent the fictional world of Kafka’s unfinished novel Amerika.

Silence of the Sirens

Diana Vidrascu
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
FRANCE, 2019, 16MM>DIGITAL, 34 MIN
FRENCH/CREOLE/ENGLISH (WITH FRENCH/ENGLISH SUBTITLES)

 

Inspired by Kafka’s short text “The Silence of the Sirens,” which reinterprets Homer’s deadly songstresses as silent apparitions, the film focuses on a fictionalized portrait of Céline, an actress from Martinique. The myth is cinematographically sublimated through an exercise in translation and appropriation. The islands are navigated from the original Greek poem through Kafka’s prose to a literary French translation and a text performance in Creole, ceasing in an improvised poetic translation.

 

Mount Song

Shambhavi Kaul
INDIA/USA, 2013, DIGITAL (FOUND FOOTAGE), 9 MIN
NO DIALOGUE

 

A current runs underneath. It creeps under the door, makes its way into the cracks, revealing, obfuscating, or breaking as clouds in the sky. Mountain, cave, river, forest, and trap door; martial gestures, reiterated, stripped, and rendered. A storm blows through. Here, the surfaces of set constructions are offered for our attachments.

Glenville

Kevin Jerome Everson & Kahlil I. Pedizisai
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
USA, 2020, 16MM>DIGITAL, 2 MIN
NO DIALOGUE

 

Based on the 1898 film Something Good—Negro Kiss, filmed during a New Year’s Eve celebration in Cleveland, Ohio.

There’s A Hole In The Sky Part II; listening to James Baldwin

Helen Cammock
UK/BARBADOS/SWEDEN, 2016, DIGITAL, 11 MIN
ENGLISH

 

There’s a Hole in the Sky Part II (2016) follows the trail of sugar back over the Atlantic, where footage of the Tate & Lyle factory in east London is overlaid with an imagined conversation with American writer James Baldwin.

Morel’s Yellow Pages

Filipa César
GERMANY, 16MM>DIGITAL, 2012, 11 MIN
SPANISH (WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES)

 

Morel's Yellow Pages focuses on secretive and destructive actions and image making. The title references The Invention of Morel (1940), Adolfo Bioy Casares’s science fiction novel, which informs the work. The artist brings together her research into the use of Baltra Island as an air base for the US Army during World War II, and aerial surveillance photographs of the islands, using film footage, documents, and factual information collected during her trip to the Galápagos.

 

The extract from The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares (PDF here) accompanies the film and is meant to act as a takeway at each screening.

  • Kevin Jerome Everson (b. Mansfield, Ohio) is Professor of Art at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. His art practice encompasses sculpture, photography, and films that have exhibited internationally at festivals, art biennials, museums, galleries, cinemas, distributed online, and on Blu-ray/DVD. He is the recipient of the Guggenheim, Berlin and Rome Prizes; the Heinz Award and the Alpert Award in Film/Video.

  • Filipa César is an artist and filmmaker interested in the fictional aspects of the documentary, the porous borders between cinema and its reception, and the politics and poetics inherent to the moving image and imaging technologies. Since 2011, she has been researching the origins of the cinema of the African Liberation Movement in Guinea Bissau as a laboratory of resistance to ruling epistemologies.

  • Burak Çevik (1993, Istanbul) founded FOL Cinema Society and has curated experimental and arthouse film screenings. He was lecturer of the Non-Fiction film course from 2018-2020 at Istanbul Bilgi University. His films The Pillar of Salt and Belonging premiered at Berlinale Forum in a row, 2018 & 2019. His video works have been screened at various festivals such as Locarno, Toronto, and New York Film Festival.

  • Diana Vidrascu (1987, Romania) is a filmmaker based in Paris, France. Working with film, photography, and installation, Diana Vidrascu questions the narrative devices of cinema by challenging the limits of the narrative discourse and codes of the film genres. She debuted as a director in 2017 and her films have screened in international festivals like: Locarno Film Festival, Berlinale Forum Expanded, IFFR International Film Festival Rotterdam, BFI London Film Festival Experimenta, and Chicago International Film Festival.

  • Shambhavi Kaul has exhibited her work at the international film festivals of Toronto, Berlin, New York, Rotterdam, Edinburgh, London, Oberhausen, and Experimenta, India. Her work was featured in the 10th Shanghai Biennale, she has presented two solo shows at Jhaveri Contemporary in Mumbai. She teaches at Duke University.

  • Kahlil I. Pedizisai (b. Cleveland, Ohio) is a multimedia artist/documentarian who works in the mediums of performance, photography, film, and audio. He is currently a Lacroute Initiative Visiting Artist in Residence at Linfield University. He teaches photography and film.

  • Helen Cammock explores history and storytelling through layered, fragmented narratives. Using video, photography, installation, print, and performance, she interrogates the ways in which stories are told, and acknowledges those who are rendered invisible by the hierarchy of histories. The artist’s own story also impacts her work. Having worked as a social worker before becoming an artist, she remains attentive to the structural oppression and inequality across communities she saw during this time. Cammock’s work is prefaced by writing, borrowing the words of others to use alongside her own. Cammock was born in Staffordshire, UK, in 1970, and lives and works in Brighton and London. She is represented by Kate MacGarry, London.

Co-presented with

  • Charles Street Video
  • Digital Arts Ressource Centre