a soft landing

June 29

 —  August 6

Self Assessment
Masking
Wheelchair
Contact Tracing
Reduced Capacity
Image Description: Eve Tagny, Labouring bodies [eulogy for the soil], 2021, Video, 26 min 36 s. Video still provided courtesy of the artist.

Location: Gallery TPW, 170 St. Helens Ave, Toronto

Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Sunday, 11AM-  5PM

 

 

 

COVID-19 Policy:

Images Festival is committed to providing an accessible festival and continues to work to reduce barriers to participation at our events. This year, we are implementing a COVID-19 policy to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission for all, and to prioritize the participation of people who are disability-identified, immunocompromised, or part of an otherwise vulnerable group.

 

The following guidelines will be in place:

 

Masking: Masking is mandatory when visiting the exhibition.

Self-Assessment: We ask that staff and participants screen themselves for COVID-19 before visiting the exhibition.

Reduced Capacity: A maximum of six (6) visitors will be allowed in the gallery.

Contact Tracing: Visitors must sign-in sheet at the front desk before entering the gallery.

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a soft landing considers the reparative and restorative potential of slowness. Though soft in aesthetic and theme, the exhibition showcases artworks by critically lauded, so-called Canadian artists who consider the effect of global events, such as the pandemic, on mental health and personhood. The exhibition will house multi-disciplinary work including installation, sculpture, and video. 

 

With compassion at its core, a soft landing celebrates the slow process of coming together while adjusting one’s comfort levels to the current phase of the pandemic. The in-person exhibition will be held at Gallery TPW and is host to artworks by Alyssa Alikpala, Erika De Freitas, Rihab Essayh, Eve Tagny, and Alize Zorlutuna. 

 

— Jaclyn Quaresma

  • Alyssa Alikpala is a Filipinx interdisciplinary artist, designer, and researcher.  Born in Vancouver and currently living in Toronto, Alyssa works across sound, sculpture, installation, and ephemeral forms exploring the sensorial body and its relation to material and environment, focusing on the physical process both as a way of generating insight and as a meditative practice. Her current body of work includes impromptu interventions, inviting slowness and sensitivity. The works have become a vessel for healing and acceptance. 

  • Erika DeFreitas’ multidisciplinary practice includes performance, photography, video, installation, textile, drawing and writing. Placing emphasis on gesture, process, the body, documentation and paranormal phenomena, DeFreitas mines concepts of loss, post-memory, legacy and objecthood.

  • Rihab Essayh (she/her) is Canadian-Moroccan interdisciplinary artist whose large-scale, immersive installations create spaces of slowing down and softening. Her research considers issues of isolation and disconnection in the digital age, imagining futurities of soft- strength and social reconnection by proposing a heightened attunement to colour, costume, tactility and sound.

  • Eve Tagny is a Tiohtià:ke/Montreal-based artist. Her practice considers gardens and disrupted landscapes as mutable sites of personal and collective memory — inscribed in dynamics of power, colonial histories and their legacies. Weaving lens-based mediums, installation, text and performance, she explores spiritual and embodied expressions of grief and resiliency, in correlation with nature’s rhythms, cycles and materiality. Tagny has a BFA in Film Production from Concordia University and a Certificate in Journalism from University of Montreal. Recent exhibitions include Musée de Joliette, Momenta Biennale, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal and Centre Clark, Montreal; Cooper Cole, Gallery 44, and Franz Kaka, Toronto. She is the recipient of the Mfon grant (2018), the Plein Sud Bursary (2020) and has been shortlisted for the CAP Prize (2018), the Burtynsky Photobook Grant (2018) and the OAAG Award (2020).

  • Alize Zorlutuna is a queer interdisciplinary artist, writer and educator whose work explores relationships to land, culture and the more-than-human, while thinking through settler-colonialism, history, and solidarity. Having moved between Tkarón:to and Anatolia (present-day Turkey) both physically and culturally throughout their life has informed Alize’s practice—making them attentive to spaces of encounter. Alize enlists poetics and a sensitivity to materials in works that span video, installation, printed matter, performance and sculpture. The body and its sensorial capacities are central to their work. Alize has presented their work in galleries and artist-run centres across Turtle Island, including: Plug In ICA, InterAccess, VIVO Media Arts Centre, Mercer union Centre For Contemporary Art, Doris McCarthy Gallery, Art Gallery of Burlington, XPACE, Audain Art Museum, Access Gallery, as well as internationally at The New School: Parsons (NY), Mind Art core (Chicago) and Club Cultural Matienzo (Argentina). Alize has been a sessional instructor in the Faculty of Art at OCAD University since 2015.

Co-presented with

  • Gallery TPW
  • Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival

Images Festival

309-401 Richmond St West
Toronto ON 
M5V 3A8 Canada

Telephone +1 416 971 8405
Office Hours •  Tuesday–Friday • 10AM–6PM
Closed Mondays from May–January

Supporters

  • Canada Council for the Arts
  • Government of Canada
  • Ontario Arts Council
  • Telefilm Canada
  • Toronto Arts Council
  • Vtape
  • York University School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design
  • 0_TD
  • Digital Arts Ressource Centre
  • The Japan Foundation
  • The Fabulous Festival of Fringe Film
  • CalArts
  • Art Museum

Images Festival would like to acknowledge

The land on which we gather and organize is the territory of the Anishinaabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee, the Huron-Wendat, and the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. Today, the meeting place of Toronto is home to many Indigenous peoples.

A territorial acknowledgement can demonstrate a coming to awareness, and provoke thought and reflection, all of which are essential in beginning to establish reciprocal relations. This acknowledgement should not function as closure, resignation, or acceptance of the structural conditions of settler colonialism that remain in effect today. The Images Festival will continue to ask what it means for us to keep open a spirit of sustained inquiry into the complexities of our context.