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Christopher T Bianchi, Noisy, Violent, Streams of Silence, 2019

This program showcases a series of short performances for video. Dealing with themes of land, gender, technology, disability, and queer futurity, these performances represent a variety of ways the body encounters its natural and built environments.

 

Bodies are shown at times as active, engaged, and in movement, impressing themselves upon the space they inhabit. Other times, the body is still, passive, and disengaged. The space instead impresses upon the body. This reversal occurs in both the transitions between films and within the films. Together, the works erode the contrast between activeness and passiveness. 

—Jeremy Saya

 

Jellyfish contains discussions of gender dysphoria.

 

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with select artists moderated by Jeremy Saya.

 

• • • • •

 

 

Noisy, Violent, Streams of Silence
Christopher T Bianchi
USA, 2019, DIGITAL, 10 MIN, NO DIALOGUE

Noisy, Violent, Streams of Silence presents a space within the psyche of the subject. The video displays a person’s attempt at removing one’s guard, and to think or express some resistance against the norm in order to protect one’s silence.

 

Rock Piece (Ahuriri Edition)
Asinnajaq

CANADA/NEW ZEALAND, 2019, DIGITAL, 4MIN, NO DIALOGUE

Using natural elements and sounds, this experimental film explores the connection between the body and land.

 

Against Landscape
Joshua Gen Solondz
USA, 2013, DIGITAL, 4 MIN, NO DIALOGUE 

“Challenging the romanticization of West Coast scenery, Josh Solondz creates a starling work of land art in Against Landscape. Whether political, performative, or both, the artist’s plucky gesture and the video’s precise framing limit the limits of control.” —Andréa Picard

 

How Does It Feel
Bridget Moser
CANADA, 2016, DIGITAL, 9 MIN, NO DIALOGUE

A series of wordless actions performed in a Delta hotel room. With a handmade sweater inspired by a dream, a light-up motorized winter scene, a replica Princess Diana engagement ring, a replica Titanic necklace, a replica Blue Boy cross stitch, the CN Tower, and a coffee table biography of the founder of the popular Sandals luxury resort chain.

 

Inclinations
Danielle Peers and Alice Sheppard
CANADA, 2019, DIGITAL, 5 MIN NO DIALOGUE

Inclinations began as a moment of “crip” play. The ramp becomes a source of creative movement. Dancers can move in ways that they cannot move on flat surfaces and the ramp itself becomes an artistic object, transformed albeit temporarily into an environment that reveals connection, trust, beauty, and desire. Choreographed, directed, and shot from disability perspectives, this dance-on-video delves into the playful connection enabled where disability, community, and ramp meet.

 

Jellyfish
Maryna Makarenko 
GERMANY, 2017, DIGITAL, 23 MIN ENGLISH, GERMAN

Jellyfish is a cinematic novel; a meditative approach to talk about notions of gender by translating cognitive knowledge and literary elements into filmic narrative. The film depicts two types of characters: inhabitants of the fictional planet of gender utopian society that are gender fluid, and real characters who find themselves outside of cisnormativity. It offers another way of seeing gender with its possibility to float between different forms without limitations and restrictions.

  • Bridget Moser is a performance and video artist whose work is suspended between prop comedy, experimental theatre, performance art, absurd literature, existential anxiety, and intuitive dance. She has presented work in venues across Canada, including the Art Gallery of Ontario, Mercer Union, the Art Museum at the University of Toronto, Oakville Galleries, Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Front, MSVU Art Gallery, PLATFORM Centre, and the Dunlop Art Gallery. She has been shortlisted for the Sobey Art Award.

  • Christopher T Bianchi earned his BFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in Montréal and his MFA in Art + Technology from the University of Florida. Through these institutions, he developed an artistic practice that connects built environments with the unconscious space of the psyche.

  • Danielle Peers is a community organizer, artist, and Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation at the University of Alberta. Danielle uses critical disability theories to study disability movement cultures: from the Paralympics, to inclusive recreation, to disability arts. Their research builds on their experiences as a Paralympian, a filmmaker, and a dancer with CRIPSiE (Collaborative Radically Integrated Performers Society in Edmonton).

  • Joshua Gen Solondz is an artist working in moving image, sound, and performance. He’s screened in a variety of festivals including Images, Toronto International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Onion City, Black Maria, Portland International, Milwaukee Underground, CAAMFest, San Diego Asian Film Festival, Chicago Underground, Mar del Plata, FIC Valdivia, Viennale, and New York Film Festival’s Projections. Josh studied at Bard College and received his MFA from the California Institute of the Arts. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

  • Maryna Makarenko is a Ukrainian-born and Berlin-based interdisciplinary artist, mainly working with video and performance. She entwines documentary elements with fiction to initiate parallel narratives of otherness experienced beyond dominating models of the present. She studied journalism and media art at the Berlin University of the Arts, OCAD University in Toronto, and Kyiv National University.

  • Asinnajaq is a visual artist, filmmaker, and writer. She studied cinema at NSCAD University in Halifax. Her work is fuelled by respect for human rights, a desire to explore her Inuit heritage, and a sense of wonder in what she calls “the abundant beauty of the world.”

Co-presented with

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre
  • FADO Performance Art Centre
  • Toronto Queer Film Festival (TQFF)
  • University of Toronto Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design